Monthly Archives: June 2014

‘Daddy, tell me the fairytale again about the writer who writes everything perfectly the first time.’

When I was in college, I thought that published professors were prolific because they never had to edit. I believed they wrote everything perfectly, the first time.
I had a teacher who wouldn’t give up on me and my writing. She urged me to edit, and finally, one night my computer went down and I had to rewrite a paper I had just written from the beginning (for those of you who don’t remember, computers didn’t use to make automatic copies, you had to remember to save it. I turned off my computer without saving and had t start over.) It was 11:00 PM on a Sunday night and the paper was due at 8:00 AM.
I had no other choice but to write it again. It came out better than any paper I’d ever written. My teacher asked me what I had done, and I told her my sad story. She recommended I treat all my papers that way in the future, write it, don’t save it, and write it again.
I lamented that I wasn’t like her. She looked puzzled about what I was comparing. I told her I couldn’t write an article correctly the first time. She laughed and asked me what I thought the seven containers of colored paper in her office were form.
I had seen the bins, but had never thought about what they were for. “You like colors?” I said. This time she had a hearty laugh.
‘No,’ she said. I write all my articles seven times. Each color is an edit. I only write on white for the last edit. Then, if my paper doesn’t get published seven times, I write it again and send it off again.
She was often published using her method. No, I don’t want to get into a discussion about methods of editing. What I want to stress is that however you decide to go about editing, it is a major part of the writing process. I would venture a guess that editing is 80% of writing.
Think about it this way: Edison said that genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration. I’m suggesting similarly that writing is 20% getting word on paper, then 80% editing those words until you get it right. Editing is the perspiration part of writing.

Just Sayin

It’s my blog so I don’t have to stick with my subject. The following falls under the category of ‘Just sayin.’

Today there was news about the people of the Ukraine saving children in harm’s way by sending fleets of vans to the east and escorting them to the west. The author wrote the story in such a way to pluck the heartstrings of the reader fearing for the fate of the endangered children.
Today there was news about the people of Central America saving their children in harm’s way by sending them north to the United States, fearing for the fate of their own children. The author wrote the story in such a way to horrify Americans in fear of being overrun by brown-skinned children.
Why the difference?
Ukrainian children are white and they are far enough away that if they make it or not, we will not know. Blue-eyed children are angels.
Spanish children are similar to the Indian Untouchables in a sense. Some of them clean for white Americans, they do the work Americans don’t want to do. Many don’t want them here. They especially don’t want more of them here. Brown-eyed children aren’t as precious as blue-eyed ones in some people’s eyes.
I don’t believe any of that, but I can think of no other reason Ukrainian children would receive positive press when they are being saved and Spanish-speaking children should be regarded with fear.
Let’s face it. Americans have a double standard toward whites and people of color. My suggestion, go to National Geographic’s website: http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/ngs/browse/productDetail.jsp?productId=2001246&gsk&code=SR90002&keyword=national+geographic+genome&OVMTC=Exact&site=&creative=34441943297&OVKEY=national%20geographic%20genome&url_id=42940401&adpos=1t1&device=c&gclid=CjkKEQjwiPWcBRCTj_-Vz8fE3cMBEiQAZIMSUt4wgLVd8Tb9wP38qjqbdsqLvNZB8W_3EpI3oyNyLWTw_wcB
There you can find information about the Genographic Project. If you send in your genome for testing, you will find we all come from Africa, ultimately. Everyone living today is a descendant of Africans. Many of us have Asian ancestry, European ancestry, as well as American Indian ancestry.
What does this all mean? We are all related – all related. Not a single race is from a ‘pure’ race. The idea of a pure race is an 18th century fantasy. There is no master race, there is no pure race, there is no race more precious than another. We are one – all one.
If you don’t believe that, Jesus, not a white European, loves you.